Monday, August 31, 2009

An Ethics Question

Suppose you hired a local mechanic/alcoholic (though you weren't aware at the time he was an alcoholic) to work on your car. Suppose you gave him $900 in advance of the work, and he proceeded to be in possession of your vehicle for 5 months. Then he never returned your calls, but when your husband finally stopped by and caught him at home, he told the tragic story about how his 94-year-old father was tortured and murdered by drug dealers in some completely freakish scenario, and when you looked it up on the internet it turned out to be true, so you felt a little sorry for him and understood why he might be stinking drunk all the time and not able to work on your car - not to mention that he was in a terrible truck accident about 10 years before and is in constant pain. So you let it go on a little longer until you've finally had enough, and you go pick up your car, only to find out he didn't do a damn thing to fix it.

What do you do then? Do you let it go, out of compassion, and consider it a lesson learned? Or do you stand up to be the one who stops enabling this person to be an alcoholic who is screwing people over (since you find out you aren't the only one he's done it to)?

Remember, there are no right or wrong answers, but keep in mind this guy is an alcoholic who carries a handgun.

By the way, I missed you all.

6 comments:

AK™ said...

copious amounts of electric shock provided by either a homemade stun gun(disposable cameras with a flash work) or a store bought stun gun.

;)

MauritaMason said...

Awesome. Thank you. And then I steal his motorcycle?

Nautilus said...

Chase the money and remember if you let him get away with it you are encouraging his lifestyle choices. So by getting your money back you are helping him.

Oh and buy two guns, install an alarm system and security lights at home and get a BIG dog.

gaily said...

oh wow. I find myself being an enabler so much of the time. I really respect it when someone takes a stand and doesn't allow themselves to be taken advantage of. I also agree that it would help him grow up!

...on the other hand...a gun you say?

Simon said...

Since I am a compassionate man, I would let it go, and put it down to experience. I would then recommend his services to all I met, until I was trusted by no one and despised by everyone. Such is the nature of kindness.

Marie said...

Nine hundred dollars is a lot of money. It isn't your fault all that stuff happened to him no matter how sad it is for him. I would ask for it back nicely a few times. Heck, even set up a payment plan. If he doesn't well... small claims court?